Return to site

Most Common Halloween Dangers For Pets

Halloween is a wonderful time for kids and your loved ones, but this is also that time of the year when your pets are most likely to harm themselves in some or the other way. Here are some of the most common Halloween dangers for pets, and simple steps you can take for avoiding your Halloween night into becoming a real nightmare -

Chocolates:

One of the biggest Halloween dangers for pets is chocolates. It is quite likely for dogs to reach out to chocolates during Halloween celebrations, eventually making them fall really sick. As a pet owner, you must be already aware of the fact that chocolates, candies and excessive sweets pose a great threat to your dogs and pups lives. Chocolates, especially the ones that come in darker and bitter variations can be poisonous if ingested by dogs, leading to symptoms like, vomiting, diarrhea as well as seizures. Therefore, it is highly recommended that you keep chocolates out of your pet’s reach during Halloween, and save them from falling sick.

Raisins: 

The second most dangerous thing that can happen to your pet during Halloween is ingestion of raisins. Raisins are nothing less than poison for dogs, as even a small portion of raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs. Some of the most common symptoms of poisoning due to ingestion of raisins include, kidney failure, nausea, vomiting, foul breath, pain, too much or no urination etc.

Halloween Costumes: 

During the week of Halloween, it is quite likely for many pet owners to dress up their cat or dog with costumes. While, it is always fun to see your adorable pet in a cute costume, it is also something that can pose a danger to your pet in some way or the other.
In order to protect your pet from any danger caused by a Halloween costume, you need to make sure that the costume doesn’t block your pet’s vision or breathing in any way. Also, you must avoid choosing costumes for your pets that contain beads, chains or any small adornments. Such things if ingested make your pet vulnerable to poisoning, and this is the last thing you want during Halloween.

Candles:

If you are planning to lit candles in your home during Halloween celebrations, then make sure that you place them carefully and out of reach of your pets. Pets are curious by nature and are quite prone to burn and injure themselves when around lit candles.

Plastic/Foil Wrappers:

Another great Halloween danger for pets is plastic and foils candy wrappers. You need to understand that when it comes to consuming a candy or chocolate, your pet might eat the wrapper as well. Candy wrappers made of foil, cellophane or plastic materials can cause serious damage to your pet’s health, which might even need a surgery to control the situation. Some signs of ingesting wrappers by pets include, vomiting, no appetite and difficulty in defecating. Look out for these signs, and if you sense that your pet has ingested a candy wrapper, hurry up and rush to your nearest vet as soon as possible.

Glow Sticks & Glow Jewelry:

You curious and mischievous pets can find glow sticks and glow jewelry quite fascinating. But, one wrong step and it could lead to dangerous consequences for your pet’s life. Glow sticks and glow jewelry can also cause irritation to your pet’s skin and eyes. Hence, it is best to keep such things far from the reach of your loved pets.

This Halloween, make sure to keep your pets safe by taking into consideration all the above mentioned precautionary measures. Your pets are your responsibility, and while Halloween is a great time to have fun with your loved ones, it is also a time when your pets need your special attention. It is really important that you keep an eye on your pet during Halloween, so if anything goes wrong, your pet is not left unattended for long.

If you notice any difference in your pet’s behavior, or feel that it has ingested something poisonous, wait no more and reach out to any of our clinics as soon as possible. In the case of an emergence here are the numbers you call 24/7.

All Posts
×

Almost done…

We just sent you an email. Please click the link in the email to confirm your subscription!

OK